NEWS

THE ART NEWPAPER にて、取り上げられました。(Sep 10, 2015)

The Buck Stopped Here: START Art Fair is a truly global affair

START Art Fair (until 13 September) director Niru Ratnam was literally coming up roses yesterday. He welcomed preview visitors while immersed in the ever-shifting digital blooms created by Tokyo-based collective teamLab, which was one of the most popular—and Instagrammed—projects of the fair. And he had a lot to smile about, with plaudits rolling in for the second edition of this 47-gallery fair that lives up to the much bandied term “boutique” by comfortably occupying three floors of the elegantly neutral retail-ish Saatchi Gallery spaces. But START is rarely bland and genuinely lives up to the well-worn “global” label. There are galleries from Bogotá to Budapest via Colombo and Cape Town, Jeddah, Lagos, Riga and Seoul, which combine a high level of quality with some genuine surprises. 

High points include a combination of vintage Czech and Slovak conceptual art at Bratislava’s Soda Gallery; the disquietingly manipulated vintage photographs of Lucia Tallova; a giant, coiling graphite drawing by young Iranian Farhad Gavzan on Tehran’s Dastan Basement space; and some haunting little figurative paintings from young Georgian artist Maka Batiashvili on Project ArtBeat from Tbilisi. Art from Asia is a START speciality. Notable shows include a specially organised exhibition of radical work from Singapore; Osage Gallery’s particularly beautiful solo stand of Au Hoi Lam’s meditative riffs on language and font; Bae Jin Sik’s monolithic cement and glass heads from South Korea; and Sri Lankan Pala Pothupitiye at Colombo’s Hempel Galleries presenting finely wrought sculptural weapons that tap into the history of violence on the island.Nearer to home, Peckham-based Arcadia Missa explore post-internet gender politics. One of the fair’s strongest and most disquieting statements is Italian-Eritrean Aida Silvestri—at London’s Roman Road Gallery—who literally traces the traumatic route taken by Eritrean refugees who have travelled illegally to the UK in lines stitched across their blurred faces. Is there room for another art fair in London? In the case of START, the answer has to be a resounding YES!

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL にて、取り上げられました。(Sep 10, 2015)

Tokyo’s Art Scene Goes High-Tech

Japan’s digital dominance is now on vivid display in the capital’s museums and galleries. The trick is finding them

I WAS WADING through a white-walled gallery in Tokyo last winter, where 2,300 intricately mottled and bearded orchids dangled from the ceiling. Each living flower was kitted out with motion sensors so that strands of the hanging vines gently rose into the air as I approached, creating a flower-tunnel effect wherever I walked. The surreal delicacy of the experience was heightened by a tinkling, ethereal soundtrack piped into the room for an effect that was equal parts heaven and allergy commercial. It was also just plain cool.

The artists behind this work, “Floating Flower Garden,” are teamLab, a Tokyo collective specializing in site-specific, digital installations. teamLab also designed the Japan pavilion at Expo Milano 2015 (through Oct 31) and have exhibited at Milan’s Salone de Mobile, Hong Kong’s Art Basel and several other events. Last year, teamLab was picked up by the New York-based Pace Gallery—which also represents blockbuster contemporary artists including Kiki Smith and Sol LeWitt, an unexpected crossover between the all-too-often cloistered worlds of art and technology. What wasn’t a surprise was that the high-tech work came from Tokyo, a city that has never shied away from electronics and artful digitization.

Tokyo’s contemporary art scene has long been overshadowed by Hong Kong and Beijing and dominated by Pop-movement artists like Yoshitomo Nara, Takashi Murakami and Yayoi Kusama. But in the last five years, a small group of contemporary Japanese artists including Tabaimo, Hiraki Sawa and teamLab have begun quietly embracing digital and other high-tech methods, often as a way to express modern interpretations of more traditional Japanese art forms—such as woodblock printing, ikebana (flower arrangement) and even anime, bringing the city to the global fore in the realm of digital art.

Since English is scarcely spoken in Tokyo and galleries are scattered widely around the 5,200-square-mile megalopolis of 38 million people, the best way to experience this new genre is to hire an art guide. I arranged mine through the Palace Hotel Tokyo, which recently joined with Blouin Artinfo, the media company behind art magazines including Art + Auction and Modern Painters, to offer customized tours of Tokyo’s art scene. Blouin offers eight-hour private art tours to non-hotel guests for about $415 a day; the Palace Hotel Tokyo’s three-night Transcendent Tokyo package costs $1,645 and includes breakfast, drinks, club-lounge access and a deluxe balcony room in addition to the private art tour. After a few email exchanges with my guide Darryl, a Harvard grad from Singapore who has lived in Tokyo for 8 years, we met up for lunch at a trendy soba noodle place in the popular Ebisu district to map out our tour.

Our first stop: NADiff A/P/A/R/T, an art book shop and complex of galleries housed in a discreetly marked glass and steel structure on an Ebisu back street that I never would have found on my own (Shibuya, 1-18-4, nadiff.com). NADiff is one of Tokyo’s best places to see the work of young, avant-garde artists. At the G/P Gallery, on the second floor, we viewed Takashi Kawashima’s high-definition black-and-white landscape photographs, which are beautiful in their own right but were overlaid with projected film clips—a still volcano puffed ghostly plumes of smoke, a quiet mountain is orbited by moving clouds (gptokyo.jp).

Next up, Darryl led me to the annual, late-winter Yebisu International Festival for Art & Alternative Visions, which runs in February and March and showcases new-media technologies (1-13-2 Mita, Meugro-ku, yebizo.com). This year it included exhibits by Noriko Yamaguchi, whose “Keitai Girl” is a sexy she-bot made of cellphone keypads, and Fujiko Nakaya, who opened Japan’s first video art gallery in 1980 and specializes in “fog sculptures.”
Darryl was a font of arty intel and had plenty of suggestions for where to go on my own after the tour was finished. These included a reservation at Tsuru Ni Tachibana, a “punk-rock kaiseki” restaurant (Asagayakita 2-4-7, Suginami-ku, falco.sakura.ne.jp/tsuru ) and Bar Zingaro, an artist-project/cafe hidden deep in a manga mall in the off-the-path neighborhood of Broadway Nakano (5 Chome-52-15, bar-zingaro.jp ).

Those who prefer to explore on their own should download Tokyo Art Beat, the exhaustively comprehensive iPhone app, ($2), which is hands down the best guide to the city’s art world and updated regularly with exhibits, events, parties and art fairs. It allows users to search for exhibits by genres that include video installation, digital and performance.

Clicking on its “digital” tab led me to the Tabaimo exhibit at Gallery Koyanagi hidden away on the eighth floor of an office tower in Ginza (Koyanagi Bldg. 8F, 1-7-5, gallerykoyanagi.com). I am a fan of Tabaimo’s work and had seen her at Art Basel and in shows at New York’s James Cohan Gallery. She lives in the Nagano Prefecture and uses a unique method of capturing the “color” of Edo-period woodblock prints by hand drawing them, then scanning the images into a computer to create animated shorts that often have a dark twist. Some of Tabaimo’s pieces are projected into the adjoining corners of the wall and ceiling with different panels playing out different dramas, others onto a wall with pieces of sofas and coffee tables protruding from it, blurring the lines between 2-D and 3-D.

“I don’t want to be thought of as a ‘digital artist,’ ” Tabaimo told me when I met her at the gallery. “It’s not that I don’t use technology, but the term suggests something else and I’d hate to disappoint audiences expecting something more high-tech. For me, using the computer is just a tool to get my art to the world.”

Annoyingly, what the Tokyo Art Beat app doesn’t let you do is search by artist, which I discovered after trying to find one of my favorites.

I first encountered Japanese artist Hiraki Sawa in London, where he now lives, but his work—an elegant layering of film and animation—is regularly on display at Tokyo’s OTA Fine Arts and is distinctly Japanese (6 Chome-6-9 Roppongi, Minato, otafinearts.com). His high-definition films of airplanes flying past bathroom sinks and lush waterfalls are often looped on minuscule flatscreens and sometimes hidden inside hand-carved wooden boxes, creating a sort of digital jewel box.

If you only have time for one stop in Tokyo, head to Miraikan, the National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation, which is equal parts EPCOT and Art Basel and located in Tokyo’s Odaiba district, about a 30-minute subway ride from Shinjuku Station (www.miraikan.jst.go.jp/en ).

It was here on a Saturday afternoon that I waited for an hour to see teamLab’s Floating Garden exhibit (which has since moved on). Fortunately, there’s no shortage of artwork in the 10-floor mega space; other teamLab exhibits include gigantic galleries lined with interactive screens, some with elaborate 3-D graphics, others with motion sensors that alter the image depending on audience interaction.

ArchiDesignclub にて、取り上げられました。(Sep 10, 2015)

teamLab : Floating Flower Garden


Le collectif japonais Teamlab, profondément inspiré par les technologies digitales, a invité les visiteurs de M&O cet automne à une promenade sensorielle au cœur d’un jardin de fleurs suspendu. En plus de la poésie apportée par les espèces choisies, les fleurs se sont animées au rythme nonchalant de la composition musicale jouée dans le lieu.

2300 fleurs ont été suspendues, flottant dans un lieu blanc aux allures d’Eden. Inspiré du rêve, et de la féérie qu’ils peuvent parfois évoquer, le temps d’une parenthèse le lieu a plongé ses visiteurs au cœur d’un univers où le temps semblait suspendu.

Photographies : Govin Sorel

Pour en savoir plus, visitez le site de teamLab

designboom にて、取り上げられました。(Sep 10, 2015)

teamlab suspends floating flower garden at maison et objet

previously showcased at tokyo’s miraikan national museum of emerging science and innovation, japanese collective studio teamlab‘s serene installation ‘floating flower garden’ has been transported, re-suspended and put on show once again during this year’s maison et objet in paris. engrossed with a vivid and dense canopy of orchids imported from holland, visitors enter and is immediately embraced with an amalgamation of actions happening at the same time. from calming music in the background, the blend of fragrant aromas, to the flowers slowly moving and adapting to movement, it is evident that the installation aims to stimulate viewer’s senses and emotions.
comprised of a collective of designers and creatives from japan, the studio has a growing portfolio of installations that blur the boundaries between the arts and the digital domain. their engaging work often places the viewer as an active participant and ultimately, becoming part of the piece itself.

at maison et objet, we interview takashi kudo and aki hamada of teamlab where they discuss living with nature, how they resolved the ‘machinery’ movement of the flowers, and their influence of japanese zen gardens.

the creators project にて、取り上げられました。(Sep 9, 2015)

Lose Yourself in an Interactive Garden of Digital Butterflies


Japanese art collective teamLab has a penchant for placing flowers within their installations, room-sized experiences that often pit immersive digital projections in architecturally-specific settings. For their latest, Flutter Of Butterflies Beyond Borders, teamLab takes over London’s Saatchi Gallery for the START Art Fair (which opens September 10), pairing virtual flowers with swarms of digital butterflies.

As noted on teamLab’s website, the collective projects a glowing, psychedelic array of flowers and butterflies inside a mirrored walkway. To create Flutter Of Butterflies Beyond Borders, the collective digitally rendered a year’s worth of seasonal bloom and decay, all of it responsive to viewers’ activities within the mirrored hall.

“Attendees’ presence will affect their cycle and whether they wither, die, spring up and blossom, [u]ltimately exploring the boundary between nature and human behaviour,” teamLab says. “The gallery space sees butterflies flying across its walls, onto the floral imagery that looks at art being released from its constraints by the digital domain.”

A computer program built by teamLab creates the real-time interactivity. “[T]he visuals of the winged insects are not pre-recorded or played back, but continuously changing, never to be repeated,” teamLab explains.

START Art Fair kicks off September 10th and runs to the 13th.

COVETED EDITION にて、取り上げられました。(Sep 8, 2015)

FLOATING FLOWER GARDEN

Besides many-many events and conferences during Maison&Objet 2015, there was a great flower installation during the Paris Design Week this year. CovetED was surprised to attend Floating Flower Garden from TeamLab, the Japanese digital technology collective. This group invites everyone on a sensorial promenade in an immersive installation with the overtones of a suspended Eden.

Have you ever opened the doors to a garden with thousands of levitating and perfumed flowers? Floating Flower Garden is an exceptional and highly poetic sensory experience.

After last season’s dreamy banquet of birds and flowering cherry branches, the Japanese techno-artists return to Villepinte with an amazing botanical fairyland. There were used 2,300 suspended flowers, with their roots anchored overhead, float in a vivid white bubble. Petals, leaves and pistils blossom in the silence of the carnal and mysterious garden. You wont believe but the flowers grow each day thanks to the technological prowess of TeamLab. They even rise when the spectator approaches, creating a dome over his head, and then descend once again. If visitors stand in a group together, the botanical chorus is amplified but the flowers remain evasive. This is a real miracle nowadays!

This 3-D metaphor takes inspiration from a zen kôan, those part-fable, part-poetic Buddhist enigmas. TeamLab’s founder Toshiyuki Inoko explains that in the 13th century, a zen priest left his meditative retreat in the mountains to teach the path of awakening. One day, he pointed to a flower in a garden: “People today see it as if they were in a dream”, he said. “The Heaven and I come from the same roots. Everything around me and myself as well are made of the same substance”.

This is the installation’s philosophy: the delicate link it weaves between visitors and the ecosystem offers a way to restore our sense of unity with Nature. All in all, the experience of a flower garden awakens through the magic of algorithm and introduces the visitor to team Lab’s ecological message. This is totally unbelievable!Besides many-many events and conferences during Maison&Objet 2015, there was a great flower installation during the Paris Design Week this year. CovetED was surprised to attend Floating Flower Garden from TeamLab, the Japanese digital technology collective. This group invites everyone on a sensorial promenade in an immersive installation with the overtones of a suspended Eden.

Have you ever opened the doors to a garden with thousands of levitating and perfumed flowers? Floating Flower Garden is an exceptional and highly poetic sensory experience.

After last season’s dreamy banquet of birds and flowering cherry branches, the Japanese techno-artists return to Villepinte with an amazing botanical fairyland. There were used 2,300 suspended flowers, with their roots anchored overhead, float in a vivid white bubble. Petals, leaves and pistils blossom in the silence of the carnal and mysterious garden. You wont believe but the flowers grow each day thanks to the technological prowess of TeamLab. They even rise when the spectator approaches, creating a dome over his head, and then descend once again. If visitors stand in a group together, the botanical chorus is amplified but the flowers remain evasive. This is a real miracle nowadays!

This 3-D metaphor takes inspiration from a zen kôan, those part-fable, part-poetic Buddhist enigmas. TeamLab’s founder Toshiyuki Inoko explains that in the 13th century, a zen priest left his meditative retreat in the mountains to teach the path of awakening. One day, he pointed to a flower in a garden: “People today see it as if they were in a dream”, he said. “The Heaven and I come from the same roots. Everything around me and myself as well are made of the same substance”.

This is the installation’s philosophy: the delicate link it weaves between visitors and the ecosystem offers a way to restore our sense of unity with Nature. All in all, the experience of a flower garden awakens through the magic of algorithm and introduces the visitor to team Lab’s ecological message. This is totally unbelievable!

Sky にて、取り上げられました。(Sep 8, 2015)

A Londra, una fiera per soli giovani artisti


Giunta alla seconda edizione, il prossimo giovedì 10 settembre verrà inaugurata START, la fiera d’arte organizzata da Parallel Contemporary Art e Saatchi Gallery negli spazi londinesi di quest’ultima. Tra le tante rassegne dedicate al collezionismo – ovvero all’incontro tra artisti, gallerie e mecenati – l’iniziativa di questa settimana ha una particolarità che l’ha resa presto popolare in tutto il mondo: in fiera è possibile trovare soltanto opere di autori emergenti, che hanno così la loro occasione di esporre in un ambito molto simile a quello museale, almeno per la qualità del progetto complessivo.

Oltre alla fiera vera e propria con la sua nutrita selezione di gallerie ospitate, START ospiterà infatti anche quattro progetti artistici fatti e finiti. Il collettivo giapponese Chim↑Pom, tanto per cominciare, vedrà inaugurata la prima esposizione monografica a Londra, dopo aver già esposto in ambiti prestigiosi quali il MoMA PS1 di New York. All’arte socialmente impegnata del gruppo si affiancherà l’installazione di un altro collettivo giapponese, teamLab, che presenta a Londra una suggestiva fusione tra arte e nuove tecnologie.

L’attenzione per la scena artistica asiatica si conferma con il terzo progetto, Prudential Singapore Eye, che promette di costituire un’imprescindibile panoramica per diventare presto conoscitori della migliore arte realizzata – appunto – a Singapore.
Infine, il quarto progetto curatoriale – intitolato This is Tomorrow – riunirà ben dieci mostre monografiche dedicate ad altrettanti giovani artisti, accomunati dalla capacità di riflettere sui temi d’attualità e sul futuro di una società più che internazionale: altamente globalizzata, com’è quella contemporanea e presumibilmente sarà anche in futuro.

[Immagine in apertura: teamLab, Flowers and People, Cannot be Controlled but Live Together – Dark, 2015, installazione digitale interattiva. Courtesy of teamLab and START Art Fair]

Malay Mail Online にて、取り上げられました。(Sep 8, 2015)

Maison & Objet look at what’s ‘precious’ and gardens in levitation (VIDEO)

Maison & Objet look at what’s ‘precious’ and gardens in levitation (VIDEO) 
PARIS, Sept 8 — The Maison & Objet tradeshow ending today is one of France’s biggest events for decoration and design professionals. The fair not only presents the latest in trends and designs but also some unique installations and exhibits.

Precious

This year’s Maison & Objet theme is “Precious.” Trend-watcher Elizabeth Leriche hoped that this year’s installation theme would inspire visitors to question themselves on the notion of what is precious today. The exhibit’s starting point is raw material and the treasures it can be transformed into.

The second part of the exhibit focuses more on the poetic and immaterial aspects of preciousness as well as elements like air and water that in today’s world are becoming more and more precious. A pop-up bookstore, designed by stylist Vincent Grégoire of the NellyRodi agency is also found in the inspiration space.

Floating Flower Garden

Combining art and technology, the Japanese teamLab come back this year to present a very different kind of garden. For their installation, the artists displayed 2,300 flowers in mid-air. The flowers elevate when a spectator approaches and form a dome over his or her head.

The exhibit is a Kôan Zen metaphor — Buddhist enigmas between fable and poetry. The one chosen by teamLab explains that in the 13th century, a Zen priest pointed at a flower with his finger and said “people today see it as though it were a dream. The sky and I come from the same root. Everything that surrounds me including myself is made from the same substance.”

Nature and Light

In the “Ateliers d’Art de France” trends forum, Elizabeth Lerciche has created the “Supernatural” exhibit that portrays the relationship between man and nature. This exhibit shows a “nature (that) is dreamed of, magnified and transformed into a four-part dialogue.”

Visitors are presented with another world composed by light designers Akari-Lisa Ishii and Motoko Ishii. The designers created an itinerary called “Light & Happiness” composed of seven pieces. The installation will illustrate through its exploration of lighting of the future the power of light on happiness.
Fans of Dorothée Meilichzon’s work will have to check out the Elle Decoration café, designed and created by her. Her installation includes a giant 3D table on which colorful cutouts are laid, neon outlines and several alcoves.

Other cafés like café Marie Claire Maison and café Milk feature new creations by other big-name designers like Paola Navone and Andrea Marcane.

PARIS DESIGN AGENDA にて、取り上げられました。(Sep 7, 2015)

MAISON&OBJET FLOATING FLOWER GARDEN

MAISON&OBJET FLOATING FLOWER GARDEN
Florists and garden centers,
a special flower and plant-based offer

As with each session, MAISON&OBJET is showcasing a selection of creative exhibitors who play on the synergy between plant life and decoration: pots, vases, candles, artificial flowers, floral decoration, outdoor furniture, etc. A multitude of products and trends to be discovered through the aisles of the show.

MAISON&OBJET IS REINVENTING ITSELF WITH 3 MAIN WORLDS

In September 2015, MAISON&OBJET is reinventing itself by reorganizing its offer. With a desire to better meet your expectations, the show is offering a clarified presentation revolving around three major poles for a smoother visit: MAISON and its overarching range of decoration organized into different worlds;OBJET, the show’s concept store, ideal for retailers; and lastly LUXURY, DESIGN & INTERIORDECORATION and its exceptional itinerary. And on top of that, simplified visits, smoother exchanges between exhibitors and visitors and new synergies.

Floating Flower Garden by teamLab (Hall 7)

TeamLab, the Japanese digital technology collective, invites us on a sensorial
promenade in an immersive installation with the overtones of a suspended Eden.

The teamLab – FLOATING FLOWER GARDEN SPACE / Have you ever opened the doors to a garden with thousands of levitating and perfumed flowers? This exceptional and highly poetic sensory experience will be presented to you by teamLab at the entrance of hall 7.

After last season’s dreamy banquet of birds and flowering cherry branches, the Japanese techno-artists return to Villepinte with an amazing botanical fairyland. 2,300 suspended flowers, with their roots anchored overhead, float in a vivid white bubble. Petals, leaves and pistils blossom in the silence of the carnal and mysterious garden. The place evolves since the flowers grow each day thanks to the technological prowess of teamLab. As if endowed with a conscience, they rise when the spectator approaches, creating a dome over his head, and then descend once again. If visitors stand in a group together, the botanical chorus is amplified but the flowers remain evasive.

This 3-D metaphor takes inspiration from a zen kôan, those part-fable, part-poetic Buddhist enigmas. TeamLab’s founder Toshiyuki Inoko tells us that in the 13th century, a zen priest left his meditative retreat in the mountains to teach the path of awakening. One day, he pointed to a flower in a garden: “People today see it as if they were in a dream”, he said. “The Heaven and I come from the same roots. Everything around me and myself as well are made of the same substance”.
This is the installation’s philosophy: the delicate link it weaves between visitors and the ecosystem offers a way to restore our sense of unity with Nature. By modeling the wonders, the experience of a flower garden awakens us through the magic of algorithm and introduces the visitor to teamLab’s ecological message.

Artribune にて、取り上げられました。(Sep 7, 2015)

Fra la fiera Maison & Objet e la Paris Design Week, Parigi mette in scena la via francese al design. Con tanti marchi italiani, da Seletti a Internoitaliano

Tra stand, esposizioni e panel di esperti, la principale fiera dell’arredamento e della decorazione francese, Maison&Objet, riapre i battenti per affermare con sempre maggiore vigore la via francese al progetto. Con un appeal, però, decisamente in crescita tra tutti gli operatori internazionali: sono in molti a guardare a Parigi come al secondo appuntamento del calendario del design da presenziare dopo il Salone di Milano, sia per business che per esposizione mediatica. E tanti anche gli italiani, da Seletti a Internoitaliano, che non mancano all’appello.
Invariati i pilastri che hanno ormai affermato Maison&Objet come un vero e proprio format: un Créateur de l’Année – adesso è Dorothée Meilichzon – illustra con una scenografia la sua visione della decorazione di interni; i giovani designer con Les Talents à la Carte espongono le loro creazioni, mentre la mostra Floating Flower Garden (a cura del collettivo teamLab) apre le porte ad un giardino sospeso, poetico e multisensoriale. Intorno, moltissimi marchi di arredo non esitano a presentare prodotti in anteprima: qui l’occhio di riguardo va al padiglione Now! Design à Vivre, quello epurato dalle storture del gusto del mobile classico.
Non solo fiera, però: la sinergia tra gli operatori del design continua anche in città con la Paris Design Week. Fino al 12 settembre, infatti, il Fuori Salone alla parigina anima il tessuto urbano mettendo in rete la creatività di 300 tra showroom, gallerie e marchi di arredamento. Organizzata per distretti – Saint Germain, Opéra, Marais, Le Docks (alias la Cité de la Mode et du Design), Barbés-Stalingrad – non esclude i fuori programma (come le incursioni tra le dolcezze di pasticcerie e food designer) e viaggia a metà strada tra l’agenda dei migliori indirizzi della capitale e la vetrina delle novità del momento.
– Giulia Zappa
Maison&Objet
Fino all’8 settembre 20154
Paris Nord Villepinte
http://www.maison-objet.com/

Paris Design Week
Fino al 12 settembre 2015
http://www.maison-objet.com/en/paris-design-week